Speakers

  • Casey Mock

    Casey Mock is a US researcher and Chief Policy and Public Affairs Officer at the Center for Humane Technology. Mock will examine AI and deception at the 2024 JERAA Conference. His address will consider how AI disturbs coverage of this year’s US Presidential Election. He will discuss latest CHT research that explores how misinformation/disinformation harms people’s right to freedom of speech, and freedom to think, and what journalists can do to constructively respond.

  • Bridget Brennan

    Bridget Brennan is an award-winning ABC journalist who will deliver a keynote address on critical topics including reporting on Indigenous affairs and violence against women. Brennan has been a journalist with the Australian Broadcasting Corporation for more than a decade. A Dja Dja Wurrung, Yorta Yorta woman, she is a newsreader and presenter at News Breakfast, and recently the Indigenous Affairs Editor at ABC. In 2017, Brennan was appointed the ABC’s first National Indigenous Affairs Correspondent, reporting on the murders of Aboriginal women in Central Australian communities, and investigated racism in Australia’s health system and the escalating number of Aboriginal children being removed from their families. Last year, Brennan was a fellow with the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism at Oxford Universities where she researched the global pressures facing First Nations reporters in mainstream newsrooms. Brennan, together with Brooke Fryer, Suzanne Dredge and Stephanie Zillman won the 2023 Melbourne Press Club Gold Quill for their Four Corners investigation “How Many More?” which shone a light on the crisis of missing and murdered Indigenous women.

  • Gerard Ryle

    Gerard Ryle is an investigative journalist who will discuss Collaborative Journalism as a way to fight disruption in a Q&A-style conference discussion. Ryle is the Pulitzer Prize and Emmy-award winning director of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) in Washington, DC. He led the worldwide teams of journalists who worked on the Offshore Leaks, Panama Papers, Paradise Papers, Implant Files, FinCEN Files, and Pandora Papers investigations – the six biggest collaborations in journalism history. The Pandora Papers project involved more than 600 journalists at more than 150 news outlets in 117 countries working together. Ryle has won and shared in more than 90 major journalism awards from eight countries, including five Walkley Awards. In 2021, ICIJ was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize.

A/Prof Andrew Dodd
adodd@unimelb.edu.au